Thai Embassy organises fashion show powered by LIVA


In celebration of the solid bond between India and Thailand, the Thai consulate, India recently organised a fashion show powered by LIVA, a natural fluid fabric brand, from the house of Birla Cellulose, an Aditya Birla Group Company. This celebration marked the 75th year of cordial and warm relationships shared between India and Thailand.

LIVA brought two artistic powerhouses together influencing the establishment of a stronger connection between both countries as the love for culture, fashion and art brings them closer.

In celebration of the solid bond between India and Thailand, the Thai consulate, India recently organised a fashion show powered by LIVA, a natural fluid fabric brand, from the house of Birla Cellulose, an Aditya Birla Group Company. This celebration marked the 75th year of cordial and warm relationships shared between India and Thailand.

The establishment of diplomatic ties between the countries was congregated with a fashion show themed, “Weaving Together for the Future” where renowned designers from both countries presented an exclusive collection. Top designers such as Nachiket Barve and Sahil Kochhar from India and Unkuniya & Wisharawish from Thailand represented their collection using fabrics from LIVA and Thailand.

“The textile and fashion industries globally are marching towards adopting sustainable fabrics today. At this fashion show we worked together with Indian and Thailand designers focusing all our energy and grit in building a more sustainable fashion industry. We are humbled to be the flag bearers of creating sustainable circular fashion with talented designers of both countries as India and Thailand celebrate 75 years of diplomatic ties. We see this as a huge opportunity to deliver a positive and powerful message to the audiences of both countries by further strengthening the close friendship and growing partnership between the two nations,” Rajnikant Sabnavis, chief marketing officer at Aditya Birla Group’s Pulp and Fibre Business, said.

The new age fabric made with natural fibres, LIVA, is sustainable, ethically produced and renewable with a soft and luxurious feel. LIVA fabrics save landfills 6-7 times more than cotton, and consume 3-4 times less water. The extremely light and breathable nature of the fabric ensures that every fibre feels just as good as it looks, the company said in a press release.

“The embroidery, textile and techniques used to produce garments are very unique to both India and Thailand and we have tried to capture its essence in our collection by infusing heritage textiles with contemporary design sensibilities. I think it’s a great initiative taken by LIVA and the Thailand consulate to come together and bring forward the best designers and their collections. My collection is exclusively curated keeping in mind my signature craftsmanship, blending it with the best qualities of the LIVA fabrics. It was an amazing experience indeed as these fabrics blend beautifully and drape very well with our embroideries,” Indian designer Sahil Kochharsaid.

“I’m very excited to be a part of this event where we are showcasing an amalgamation of Indian and Thai fabrics alongside LIVA and celebrating the Indian heritage and Thai culture. With the magic of LIVA’s fluidity, we are bringing together a range, redefining the contemporary Indian movement. The collection has the softness of LIVA fabric married with the rich, ornate Indian brocades with the exquisite workmanship and the very intricate and beautifully done high cut fabrics. I wanted to play with the asymmetry of the South Asian costume with detailing in terms of the drapes and highlight how the fabric falls on the body with a little bit of a boldness, attitude and modernity,” award winning designer Nachiket Barvesaid.

The event concluded successfully, depicting the core values of both countries and the cultural significance they represent leading to avenues for greater cooperation and collaboration in the textile industry.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk (RR)



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